Current Events

JONES INSTITUTE FOR REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE
About Us Current Events Infertility Our Services Cost Research Our Physicians Our Locations Education

 

Congratulations to Dr. Sergio Oehninger and Dr. Silvina Bocca named "Top Docs" in the August 2012 Hampton Roads Magazine


The Jones Institute proudly announces that Sergio Oehninger, MD, PhD and Silvina Bocca, MD, PhD, have been voted some of the region’s “Top Docs” in a recent survey of their physician peers. The survey, conducted by Hampton Roads Magazine, asked over 4,000 area physicians one simple question - "What doctor would you call if you or a loved one needed medical care?"  Dr. Oehninger and Dr. Bocca were among 37 EVMS Health Services physicians to receive this honored recognition from their colleagues in the Hampton Roads medical community.  Hampton Roads Magazine honored some 250 EVMS full time and community faculty physicians and alumni.  That's more than half of the 440 doctors who were selected by peers to be a part of the annual list.  Congratulations, Dr. Oehninger and Dr. Bocca!


 
Congratulations to Dr. Silvina Bocca Named “Health Care Hero” for Reproductive Medicine

The Jones Institute proudly announces that Silvina Bocca, M.D., Ph.D., has been recognized as one of the region’s “Health Care Heroes” by Inside Business magazine for her contributions to the field of Reproductive Medicine. The award honors physicians whose performance on the job is considered exemplary by both patients and peers. Congratulations, Dr. Bocca!

Click here to view the article on the Inside Business Website!


Researchers and physicians at the EVMS Jones Institute for Reproductive Medicine discuss healthy baby conceived from 20-year-old embryo. EVMS Jones continues to lead the infertility field with medical breakthroughs.

A 42-year-old patient of Dr. Sergio Oehninger became a mother after being implanted with an embryo that was frozen 20 years ago – The longest time a fertilized egg has been stored before developing into a healthy baby. The newborn’s mother had undergone 10 years of IVF but was unable to conceive. Last year, a frozen embryo, created by another couple, was implanted into her womb and in May she gave birth to a healthy boy weighing 6lb 15oz.

The embryo was created with four other when the couple were having a successful IVF treatment in 1990. When one was successfully implanted, they donated the other four for ‘adoption’ and these were frozen.

Two decades later, the four embryos were offered to the 42-year-old woman and her husband after being selected from a list that offered the best physical match. The couple was informed about the amount of time these embryos were in storage. Only two embryos survived the thawing process and they were implanted in the woman’s womb. One survived, and the pregnancy went full term.

Dr. Oehninger has carried out research showing that the length of time embryos are frozen does not hinder their ability to grow into healthy babies.

some doctors believe frozen embryos could be stored for as long as 40 years. Previously, healthy babies had been born from embryos frozen for 13 years.

Please view other articles about this story:

    Eastern Virginia Medical School: Dr. Jacob Mayer discusses frozen embryos on CNN

    CNN.COM: VIDEO: Jacob Mayer, PhD, professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Eastern Virginia Medical School and director of the embryology laboratory at the EVMS Jones Institute for Reproductive Medicine Interviewed About Baby Born from 20-year-old Embryo

    New York Post: Baby From 20-year Egg

    Yahoo News: Healthy baby conceived from 20-year-old embryo

    The Med Guru (themedguru.com): Healthy baby boy born from embryo frozen 20 years ago

    newKerala.com: Healthy baby conceived from 20-year-old embryo


 

New clinical study in IVF:
assessment of novel and improved technologies
to select sperm for ICSI using high-magnification microscopy

View images of the daVinci robot
and photos from the microscope
(PDF)

The Jones institute is performing an IRB-approved clinical study entitled: “A randomized clinical study to examine the efficacy of IMSI (intracytoplasmic morphologically selected sperm injection), a new method to select sperm for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) in infertile couples undergoing IVF augmented with ICSI.”

Spermatozoa are typically selected for intracytoplasmic sperm injecting (ICSI) based on motility and microscopic morphological normalcy. Sperm are typically observed for ICSI at 20x magnification. Basic sperm morphology can be identified at this level of magnification; however, only severe malformations can be observed. A number of “normal”-looking sperm can possibly have subtle-moderate anomalies, including nuclear vacuoles, which cannot be observed at 20x magnification. These malformations may result in decreased fertilization and pregnancy rates, and could theoretically carry a risk of early pregnancy loss or even worse, offspring abnormalities. Identification of normal sperm morphology at a higher magnification offers a means to decrease the risk of injecting defective sperm into oocytes via ICSI. The general hypothesis is that improved methods of sperm selection will have a positive impact on oocyte fertilization, embryo development, pregnancy outcomes and the rate of delivery. The goal of this project is to compare the selection of sperm, based on sperm head and tail morphology observed at 20x for conventional ICSI procedures, to the selection of sperm using intracytoplasmic morphologically selected sperm injection (IMSI) at 6600x magnification in conjunction with special coated dishes (PICSI dish) which aid in the identification of mature sperm.

Please talk to your physician about enrollment and inclusion criteria.


Congratulations to Dr. Sergio Oehninger
Named “Health Care Hero” for Advancement in Healthcare –
Reproductive Medicine

Inside Businessarticlerecognizing Dr. Sergio Oehninger of EVMS as a "Health Care Hero" in reproductive medicine. (1.1 mb) PDF file
Republished with permission from Inside Business magazine.

The Jones Institute proudly announces that Sergio Oehninger, M.D., Ph.D., has been recognized as one of the region’s “Health Care Heroes” by Inside Business magazine for his contributions to the field of Reproductive Medicine. The award honors physicians whose performance on the job is considered exemplary by both patients and peers. Congratulations, Dr. Oehninger!


Jones Institute Clinic Featured in Peninsula Magazine

Laurel Stadtmauer, M.D., Ph.D., a physician-researcher with the Jones Institute, was interviewed for an article titled "The Jones Institute for Reproductive Medicine: Creating families, hope," in the Oyster Pointer, a monthly publication about business in the Oyster Point section of Newport News.

Read the article PDF file, reprinted from the November 2008 issue of the Oyster Pointer.


Congratulations to Dr. Silvina Bocca
Named “Top Doc” in the August 2010 Hampton Roads Magazine

Dr. Silvina Bocca, M.D., Ph.D.The Jones Institute proudly announces that Silvina Bocca, M.D., Ph.D., has been voted one of the region’s “Top Docs” in a recent survey of her physician peers. The survey, conducted by Hampton Roads magazine, asked over 4,000 area physicians one simple question – “What doctor would you call if you or a loved one needed medical care?” Dr. Bocca was among a handful of EVMS Health Services physicians to receive this honored recognition from her colleagues in the Hampton Roads medical community. Dr. Bocca was named "TOP DOC" in 2008 as well.  Congratulations, Dr. Bocca!


Office Three - Dimensional (3D) Ultrasound

The development of a three - dimensional ultrasound has permitted scanning of the uterus in previously unobtainable views. This method provides information of a similar diagnostic value as the traditional two - dimensional ultrasound but with the advantage of enabling images to be manipulated to provide a more comprehensive view of the uterus. This is a simple, quick, and noninvasive technique to detect and diagnose uterine anomalies. It allows an improved view of the endometrial cavity without the use of ionizing radiation or iodinated contrast agents needed for the HSG.

The most important advantage of the 3D ultrasound is the ability to visualize both the uterine cavity and muscle walls. It provides complete information about the nature and extent of uterine masses and congenital anomalies with low overall procedure - related risks and discomfort.


Robotically Assisted Gynecological Surgery

Jones Institute doctors are the first in the Tidewater area to perform gynecologic laparoscopies with the assistance of the "da Vinci" robot at Sentara Norfolk General Hospital. Over the last two decades, minimally invasive surgery has become increasingly popular and has been demanded by both surgeons and patients.

Its benefits lie predominantly in reducing pain and providing a more rapid recovery for patients compared to traditional surgery. In addition to providing magnification, laparoscopy avoids tissue dying, foreign body contamination, tissue abrasion from packs and bleeding from an incision.

These factors improve healing and decrease postoperative complications. The use of a controlled robot has the potential to enhance surgical precision. Robot - assisted procedures do not differ from the standard laparoscopy, but they have a superior three - dimensional view of tissue as well as better maneuverability of surgical instruments.

Read one patient’s success with the daVinci procedure in the Virginian-Pilot Monday August 21, 2006.